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Indiesew

Indiesew Fall/Winter Collection: Tamarack Jacket

October 20, 2017

I was really happy to see that the Tamarack Jacket was going to be part of the Indiesew Fall/Winter Collection. It’s a great transitional layering piece and exactly what I need for chilly mornings when I am out walking my dog. I had plans to make the coat last year, but the temperature dropped before I was able to start and I missed my window of opportunity.

I learned a lot on this project! It was the first time I’d done anything involving quilting, a walking foot, or cotton batting. I used 1.8 metres of fabric for the outside (Essex Linen in Espresso) and the lining fabric (Kona cotton). I made a straight size 6 – my usual Grainline size – and was able to get away with a crib-sized piece of batting rather than a twin. It feels a little big, but I am happy to have a size that I can layer sweaters under (anything that helps me put off getting out my winter coat is a win in my book.)

I opted to keep things simple by using the horizontal quilting instructions and choosing hook-and-eyes for closures. I’ll save the snaps and the diamond pattern for my spring version. I found the Grainline sew-along post on bias binding to be very helpful and kept it open on my laptop as I worked.The process was surprisingly straightforward.  The result is so clean and neat and felt like sewing magic. (Quilters! I had no idea about those corners!) I went back and forth on the welt pockets, but I think I will add them in after all.

While I love this jacket, it helped me realize why I make garments and not quilts. I find the actual quilting to be quite stressful – all those lines to keep straight. I also had a hard time seeing my chalk lines under the light of the sewing machine and I ended up with blue hands. Next time I will hand-baste over light chalk lines (you can still see a faint echo of the chalk now and if anyone has any suggestions on getting it out I would love to hear them). I would also use heavier thread. I increased my stitch length, but depending on the light, you can’t always see the quilting.

The jacket itself is warm and cozy and I will admit, worth the straight-line stress. It came out looking pretty classic, but it also holds up well after a visit to the dog park, too. I love the look of the bias binding against the tweedy linen and the curved hem.

Project: Essex Linen Tamarack Jacket

Total Cost: $116

Pattern: c/o Indiesew

Fabric: $90 (includes batting)

Notions: $26

Total Time: (includes cutting out the pattern) 14 hours.

Size: Straight size 6

Fit adjustments: none. Next time I will size down and do a narrow-shoulder adjustment.

What to work on: unclenching my jaw while quilting would be a good start!

 

Thank you so much to Allie for inviting me along on the blog tour. You can see the other projects using the links below!

Oct 18: Grainline Studio
Oct 20: My Handmade Wardrobe
Oct 23: The Doing Things Blog
Oct 24: Sweet KM
Oct 25: Sew House Seven
Oct 26: Threadbear Garments
Oct 27: Sew Liberated

Indiesew Fall/Winter Collection: Coram Top

October 20, 2017

There have been a few RTW pieces that I have held on to over the years, hoping to use them to recreate my favorite items. Luckily for me, Allie from Indiesew has already done the work with the Coram Top. This easy, draped shirt is exactly the kind of thing I like to wear.

Sizing-wise, I made a straight size 6, just to start somewhere. I would like to make a size 4 as well, to see the difference. The shirt is fairly wide, but the bust and shoulder darts help to create a silhouette that is relaxed, but not sloppy. I opted not to flat fell the seams on this one, as I felt it would be lost in the busy floral print (this is old Cotton and Steele rayon. You can see how I used the other colour-way of the print on my Dove Blouse). I made mine out of 1.5 metres of fabric of 44″ wide fabric, but you could get away with a metre if you wanted to get creative about the cutting layout or used store-bought bias binding.

I can see myself making many variations of this top. I’m planning another one with contrast sleeve and neckbands, but I’d also like to do one with a keyhole back and one with bias-bound seams on the outside (to copy an old Banana Republic shirt.) This would be a great pattern for mixing knits and woven fabrics together. In fact, I’m going to go so far as to say that I think this pattern is going to be the new Ogden Cami of the sewing world: it lends itself to endless hacking and interpretation, I think it’s going to be a flattering cut for a lot of people, and you can make one in an afternoon.

Thank you so much to Allie for inviting me along on the blog tour. You can see the other projects using the links below!

Project: Cotton and Steel Coram Top

Total Cost: $32

Fabric: $30

Pattern: c/o Indiesew

Notions: $2

Total Hours: 5.5 (this includes PDF assembly)

Fit adjustments: None. No FBA required!

Fabric Country of Origin: Japan

 

Oct 18: Grainline Studio
Oct 20: My Handmade Wardrobe
Oct 23: The Doing Things Blog
Oct 24: Sweet KM
Oct 25: Sew House Seven
Oct 26: Threadbear Garments
Oct 27: Sew Liberated

 

Indiesew Fall/Winter Collection: Burnside Bibs

October 20, 2017

  Welcome to the Indiesew Fall/Winter Collection Blog tour! I was very excited to see the patterns that are part of this collection. I had been drawn to the Burnside Bibs when they first came out, but I was hesitant due do my height and my shape. I am short, curvy, and overalls can sometimes look juvenile on me. I was heartened by Meg’s beautiful pair, but she is still much taller than I am! My goal was to make a pair that could wear to work and that were heavy enough to wear during the winter.

With all of this in mind, I decided to use a pin-striped wool/viscose blend fabric I found locally. Cutting out the pattern, I could see how long the legs were going to be, so I decided to do the cropped length and then shorten the leg from there. (The cropped length was full length on me). I followed the directions to choose my size based on my hip measurements and went with a straight size 8 (for comparison, I made a size 4 in the Tea House Dress). I’m really pleased with how they turned out and the paper-bag waist at the back in particular.

As I was making them, I kept thinking what a great pattern this would be if you wanted to participate in this year’s The Refashioners project! A man’s suit would give you plenty of material to cover this pattern. I love the ties, but I would recommend that you heed the suggestion in the instructions to use the folded method to construct them. I foolishly thought I would be fine sewing them with the tube method and then struggled to pull them through. My fabric was also unraveling every time I touched it and I had some serger-thread-tension-issues. I eventually solved them by using a scrap piece of fabric and systematically turning the dials until I had a result that I liked.

I know I like pattern when I end up prancing around the house in it before the garment is even finished and that was certainly the case here. I have a pair of overalls that are work-appropriate, flattering, and don’t make me feel like I am staring in a remake of Punky Brewster. And, the wool suiting I used isn’t itchy at all!

I’ve got two more projects coming up for you today, so stay tuned. Thank you so much to Allie for inviting me along on the blog tour. You can see the other projects using the links below!

Project: Pinstriped Brunside Bibs

Total Cost: $38

Fabric: $36

Pattern: c/o Indiesew

Notions: $2

Total Hours: 10 (this includes PDF assembly)

Fit: Straight size 8

Fabric country of origin: Unknown

Oct 18: Grainline Studio
Oct 20: My Handmade Wardrobe
Oct 23: The Doing Things Blog
Oct 24: Sweet KM
Oct 25: Sew House Seven
Oct 26: Threadbear Garments
Oct 27: Sew Liberated